Ducati rider on superbike leaning into a corner whilst racing

A short history of MotoGP

MotoGP is the premier motorcycle racing championship in the world: an 18-race series that will visit 14 countries on four continents this season, with pan-global television coverage. The world’s most skilled riders line up on the grid armed with cutting-edge motorcycle technology and prototype machinery.

Established as a world championship by the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) in 1949, MotoGP is now into its 67th year. It is the oldest motorsport championship in the world and is steeped in a rich history with events that have taken place in every corner of the world, and more than 2.2 million people came through the gates of the circuits to watch MotoGP in 2010.

Formerly called ‘500 cc’, the championship underwent a change in 2002, with new technical regulations that permitted the introduction of four-stroke machinery, while the engine capacity also increased to 990 cc, thus becoming MotoGP. In 2007, the rules were again altered, which limited the engine capacity to 800 cc, while in 2012, the new 1,000 cc era began.

The current MotoGP World Champion is Yamaha rider Jorge Lorenzo, who held off the title advances of his team mate Valentino Rossi, in a tightly-fought championship battle that went down to the final race of the season.

The year had got off to the ideal start for Ducati, with Andrea Dovizioso and Andrea Iannone recording a double podium finish at the first race in Qatar. The former of those managed a further two top three finishes in the next couple of races, and while both riders added to that tally as the season progressed, 2016 will no doubt see them looking to improve on the third place that Ducati eventually recorded in both the Manufacturers’ and Teams’ standings last season.

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